humilability

(hue-mill-uh-bill-uh-tea)

-the ability to employ selfless compassion and empathy for others as a grateful expression of God’s love.

“And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.’ This is the first commandment. 31 And the second, like it, is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”  Matthew 12:30-31 (NKJV)

One need look no further than a cat frantically chasing a laser pointer’s wildly zigzagging dot skimming across the floor for visual confirmation that motion attracts attention like little else.  After all, movement is typically associated with life, which, as we all know, is the ultimate visual attention-getter. 

A few mornings ago, a familiar and friendly sight enticingly beckoned me to come nearer for a closer look.  Just as it did a few years earlier, a solitary movement tantalizingly framed within a multitude of stillness captivated my attention.  No way could the cat in me walk away, then or now.   

As I drew closer, much to my curiosity’s delight, I realized that the movement I was observing was wonderfully unique from what I had previously experienced and written about a few years ago in per sway-dead or per sway-did.  Instead of an entire plant moving to the beat of the faint wind as it happened then, this time, however, the motion radiated from a single blade of tall grass that, upon closer examination, revealed an unexpected and intriguing feature. 

What was so surprising about this lone blade of dancing grass?  In a word: brokenness.  The stalk was broken and bent about two-thirds of the way up.  This imperfection resulted in a visually compelling motion resembling bowing at the waist whenever the slightest whisper of a breeze stirred the air.

Curiously a nearby similarly broken blade remained fixed and unmoving.  Hmmmm.  It’s fair to say that, yes, where this motion was concerned, the break was essential, but it was also apparent that the location played a pivotal role, as well.  If this were not so, then clearly, both broken blades standing so close to each other would have exhibited motion rather than just the one.

I find the irony so captivating here that the motion catching my eye emanated from something broken and flawed.  As we all know, the world is not particularly kind regarding things judged damaged or not measuring up.  The truth is it can be downright cold and cruel towards anything it perceives as not rising to its standards of desirability or perfection.  But, take heart, friend, because the good news for all of us “less-than” sorts is that the Lord has an entirely different perspective than the world does.

“But God has chosen the foolish things of the world to put to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to put to shame the things which are mighty;”  1 Corinthians 1:27 (NKJV)

Each of us has experienced brokenness in our lives.  Some more, some less, but the bottom line is we are all broken in some way.  The worldly method of handling our damages is to try and hide them by pushing them out of sight.  Essentially we attempt to avoid attention by immobilizing or disguising those damaged areas of our lives in hopes of blending in with everyone else.  “It’s the safe thing to do,” says our ego, which quickly tries to seal the deal on that thought by adding, “Trust me because I know what’s best for you.” 

To reveal our brokenness to the world exposes our weaknesses, and who wants to do that knowing we’ll most likely become the object of ridicule at the very least?  So, we go into stealth mode, closing and locking the door tightly behind us as best and as fast as possible.

Sadly, when we go into hiding, we subject the world and ourselves to yet another day of being held captive by shame and fear.  This thinking is in direct opposition to our calling as God’s children, however.  As believers, we’re called to more, so much more than being invisible.

“You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden. 15 Nor do they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lampstand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. 16 Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven.”  Matthew 5:14-16 (NKJV)

It’s time, brothers and sisters, to step out of the dark and into His light.  We need to embrace the life-changing potential that sincere, godly humility offers to the imprisoned and isolated of this world and to ourselves along the way.

“Think not that humility is weakness; it shall supply the marrow of strength to thy bones.  Stoop and conquer; bow thyself and become invincible.”  Charles Spurgeon

 “Therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you in due time, casting all your care upon Him, for He cares for you.”  1 Peter 5:6-7 (NKJV)

Humility is the ability to generously apply a mending salve of compassion and understanding to the world’s endless sea of walking wounded.  It finds its beginning in the refining fires of our healing and restoration.  It is not man contrived false humility that focuses on self, mind you.  No!  Genuine humility gives up the steering wheel to God and climbs cheerfully into the back seat so that someone else can sit in the front seat.  Oh, and just in case you’re asking, “Are we there yet?” there’s nothing to worry about; God will tell you every time whenever you’re there.  He is, after all, the Driver and the GPS, so sit back and pay close attention to what’s going on around you because it’s likely you’ll come upon another weary soul in need of what the Lord can offer them through you now that you’re not the driver.

“Let each of you look out not only for his own interests, but also for the interests of others.”  Philippians 2:4 (NKJV)

“Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.”  Galatians 6:2 (NKJV)

Jesus has shown us the way forward, of course.

“For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”  Mark 10:45 (NKJV)

Like the blade of grass bends in the slightest presence of the wind, the humble heart also gratefully bows at the very thought of the healing, mercy, grace, and love it has received from the Lord.  In doing so, such a heart rightfully honors the Deliverer and His intentions regarding other’s needs, all the while trumpeting they’re a part of a much larger and grander story.

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort those who are in any trouble, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God. For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also abounds through Christ.”  2 Corinthians 1:3-5 (NKJV)

 “Rare are those men or women who have glimpsed God and whose insights transform others ever afterward.  They wrestle with their humanity in a way that helps others wrestle with theirs.  They give freely of what they know with contagious joy.”  Stephen Mansfield

I can’t help but think of that familiar saying attributed to John Bradford back in the 1600s, “There but for the grace of God, go I,” uttered while he was watching a group of prisoners pass by on their way to their executions.  When it comes to our own lives, who among us can honestly testify any differently about our rescue by the Lord’s hand?  Indeed, humility worn properly is a garment of incalculable worth lovingly stitched together by His nail-scarred hands with the threads of God’s love, mercy, and grace.  It rightly honors and glorifies God.   

“Return to your own house, and tell what great things God has done for you.” And he went his way and proclaimed throughout the whole city what great things Jesus had done for him.”  Luke 8:39 (NKJV)

“who has saved us and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to His own purpose and grace which was given to us in Christ Jesus before time began,”  2 Timothy 1:9 (NKJV)

Is it not pride driven by what others might think of us that keeps us from sharing with others who are hurting the comfort and provision God has generously bestowed upon us in our times of need?  Delivered from our captivity and now safe in His embrace, where is our compassion for distressed and weary people?  Or, perhaps our once grateful heart has grown selfishly cold and turned a blind eye?  Considering all He has done for us, how can we as believers remain stoically detached and motionless in the face of the suffocating darkness others confront?

 “By this we know love, because He laid down His life for us. And we also ought to lay down our lives for the brethren.”  1 John 3:16 (NKJV)

Humilability flows freely from the heart of Jesus to you and then through you to others.  It recognizes this isn’t about you; it’s very much about the other person.

“Let nothing be done through selfish ambition or conceit, but in lowliness of mind let each esteem others better than himself. “  Philippians 2:3 (NKJV)

A humility-led person walks a mile beside a wounded soul trudging up a seemingly impossibly steep hill in their worn, tear-stained shoes and does so silently if that’s what’s needed.  Only when the time is right is the silence broken, saying, “Friend, you’re not alone.  I know something about what you’re going through because I’ve been there, too.“  Truthfully, who better to offer much-needed compassion and understanding to a person dealing with heartache than one who has experienced not only similar pain but Jesus’s subsequent rescue?

 “He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.  And what does the Lord require of you?  To act justly and to love mercy  and to walk humbly with your God.”  Micah 6:8 (NIV)

In Japan, there is an art form known as Kintsugi in which shattered pottery is made whole by mending the broken pieces back together with glue typically containing silver, gold, or platinum.   Upon completion, the revitalized object becomes more valuable and desirable than it was initially.  Those who follow this art form delight in the object’s history as revealed by the repaired joints.  In other words, the rejuvenated vessel tells a story that is worthy of celebration.

Like a Kintsugi vase, our mended brokenness, our scars, also tell an extraordinary story of redemption if we will but give them a voice.  It’s a remarkable testimony of rebirth that lifts the name of Jesus, our Healer, our Savior, high for all to see.  

Consumed by brokenness, do we become lifeless and distant from God like the static, unmoving grass, or do we embrace life by bowing before Him in grateful recognition and trust in honor of what He has done and will do with our brokenness?  Our ability to exercise humility steps forward by acknowledging the One who has healed us, for you see, only He can speak life into and through our brokenness.  How will you respond to His whisper?  Which broken blade of grass will you be?

Then He who sat on the throne said, “Behold, I make all things new.” And He said to me, “Write, for these words are true and faithful.” Revelation 21:5 (NKJV)

“Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.”  Colossians 3:12 (NIV)

1!1!1!

“Scars” by I Am They from the album “Trial and Triumph.”

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